Friday, October 12, 2007

A cat being bathed

Writing that review of In the Valley of Elah made me feel like a humorless scold (appropriately enough) so here's a picture of a cat not enjoying itself.Also congratulations to Al Gore for winning the Nobel Prize. I bet Bill Clinton is jealous.

9 comments:

cjKennedy said...

Ahahaha. Having washed a cat or two in my day, this made me laugh. There are few things more pathetic than a wet and angry cat.

I haven't read your Elah review yet, but I'm guessing you're not going to be kind...

Bo said...

Gore should feel in great company. Carter, Arafat. At this point the Iranian Prez will win it next year and make it all okay.

Jeff McMahon said...

Bo: You're an idiot.

erik said...

I think the real question now becomes:

Simon Pegg as Scotty?

Weird.

Jeff McMahon said...

Oh yeah WTF? Obviously that means he's going to be comic relief. Great.

erik said...

What I don't get is casting the Harold & Kumar guy as Sulu. Is Sulu going to be stoned and comedic as well? Is this going to turn out like a bad Smallville like nightmare? Maybe Buffy the Romulan Slayer? Eech.

cjKennedy said...

It would seem that the keepers of the Star Trek flame have no interest in what the real fans think, but are pandering to a newer younger audience.

Jeff McMahon said...

The most prominent feature of the new Star Trek is that rather than start with a fresh cast and storyline, they're going back to the original cast of characters but casting them younger and hotter, meaning that they're trying to appeal to a youth audience but also to appeal to the old-school fans at the same time via nostalgia. Personally I find it insulting when filmmakers try to fidn popularity by pandering to an audience's sense of familiarity with superficialities. I bet that Abrams' Star Trek will show us all the 'origins' of "I'm a doctor, not a _____" and "Captain, the engines canna take any more" and so on which the Harry Knowleses of the world will eat up like candy. But I'm skeptical that J.J. Abrams has any interest in the heart of Gene Roddenberry's vision, which was always the optimistic vision of humanity working together in a common future to explore the vast universe. Instead I think we'll see a lot of plot complexities and hollow melodrama.

erik said...

If we're using this as a bit of a random thread, might I add "Go Rox!"